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Nursing jobs are anything but routine. There’s no doubt a career in nursing offers plenty of diverse opportunity. You can opt to work in a specialized field in a hospital, clinic or medical office and you’ll have job security for your entire career. The field of nursing is evolving every day and nurses are steadily in demand.

In view of the high demand for nurses, and the various positions open to those with a nursing degree, today’s nurses are not limited to hospitals when it comes to nursing jobs. In fact many of the opportunities open to nurses aren’t even in medical facilities of any kind. Here is a list of nursing jobs that are not in hospitals.

Nursing Jobs

Nurse Navigator: Think of a nurse navigator as a liaison between individuals and their insurers. As the future of healthcare becomes more uncertain, obtaining insurance, settling claims, and even deciding on appropriate care can be confusing. Nurse navigators have an understanding of the needs of the patient and can help “steer” them through the ever-confusing waters of healthcare.

Hospice Nurse: Although hospice nurses are employed by medical agencies and organizations, much of the work is spent in a patient’s home, or direct bedside, providing palliative care and tending to the needs of the patient at the end of life. As a hospice nurse you would help your patient transition with dignity and remain independent for as long as possible. Those in nursing jobs as hospice nurses also provide emotional support for the patient’s family members and loved ones.

Nurse Midwife: Though the majority of births in the US happen in hospitals, birthing centers are becoming increasingly popular. Nursing jobs for nurse midwives are plentiful. As a nurse midwife you would help your patient give birth with minimal intervention. While it’s the job of the nurse midwife to promote a non-invasive environment, there are emergency precautions in place should the need arise. Typically birthing centers do have an affiliation with a nearby hospital in the case of a birthing emergency.

Mental Health Nurse: Nursing jobs in the arena of mental health are on the rise. A mental health nurse works in private clinics, within the community, in educational facilities, and the like. Psychiatric NP’s are also becoming more popular and in many states a Psychiatric NP is allowed to open a private practice.

Dialysis Nurse: A dialysis nurse is a home health nurse who is specialized in dialysis. With the growing aging population and the unfortunate rise in kidney disease, nursing jobs in dialysis are plentiful.

Concierge Nurse: One of the most interesting nursing jobs available to the business savvy nurse is that of a concierge nurse. Much like a concierge doctor, the nurse makes themselves available to patients for house calls. There is plenty of growth potential in the concierge arena of healthcare.

Occupational Nurse: Much like the concierge nurse, except occupational nurses practice in a corporate setting, serving the company’s employees. As an occupational nurse you also have the opportunity to educate the business’s employees on such topics as safety practices, how to maintain a healthy lifestyle, and disease prevention.

Public Health Nurse: A public health nurse is typically employed by state or local government agencies, and focuses on the health needs of the community. Public health nurses work in schools, community settings and local health departments. As a public health nurse you can help educate the community, provide health care, and be an instrumental part of disaster relief efforts. A job as a public health nurse is one of the most rewarding nursing jobs available.

Nurse Health Coach: A position as a nurse health coach means you can help in promoting the overall health of a community, business, or even on an individual basis. Many insurers are hiring nurse health coaches to help keep clients as healthy as possible, and reduce costs. Nurse health coaches might man 24-hour call centers promoted by insurers, or the insured may be referred to the nurse health coach for their concerns.

Life Care Planner: For the experienced nurse looking to change nursing jobs, a life care planner can be very rewarding. As a life care planner you can assist the terminally ill, or those needing long-term health care, by helping develop a care plan. Many different organizations refer individuals to life care nurses to coordinate medical care. You will ned to obtain certification and you must have previous experience as a nurse.

 

Don’t Feel Stifled in Your Career

As you can see there are many nursing jobs available to skilled, quality nurses who would prefer to work outside of a hospital setting. While many of these jobs are highly specialized, not all require certification or additional education. Your experience counts for something, but if you find hospital work a bit too stifling consider one of these nursing jobs to further your career.

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