Job Searching (Quietly) While Still Employed

In today’s job market, it’s not uncommon for workers to look for a new job while still employed.  In fact, many human resources professionals would tell you that it’s easier to find a job when you have a job.  However, failing to job search carefully could jeopardize your current position.  Here are a few tips to help you job search quietly and ethically while still employed.

Don’t bring your job search to work.

Even if you hate your boss or everyone is in a meeting, don’t do it.  Stay off the job boards and refrain from submitting your resume to potential employers while you’re on the company dime.  When you’re at work, your current job should be your only focus.  Save your job search for outside of work hours, and don’t do it on your company laptop.  Job searching at work is unethical and hurts not only your productivity, but the productivity of your entire team.  It’s also the quickest way to end up looking for a job while unemployed.

Loose lips sink ships.

No matter if you think they’re your best friend, don’t tell any of your co-workers you’re looking for a job.  If you tell one person, you might as well tell everyone.  Loose lips can jeopardize both your current and prospective jobs. You don’t want your job search and impending departure reaching your boss by way of the rumor mill.

Schedule interviews outside of work.

Try to schedule interviews before or after regular business hours.  An employer should appreciate your integrity of not wanting to interfere with your time on the clock.  However, if you are faced with a situation where you must interview during work hours, consider taking a personal or vacation day.  Because you’ll likely have to go on more than a few interviews before landing a new gig, you won’t be able to take off for every interview.  If you need to, schedule an interview during your lunch hour, but make sure to emphasize to the interviewer that you’ll be using your lunch break.

Ask for confidentiality.

Honesty is always the best policy when it comes to job searching.  Be upfront and let potential employers know that your current employer is not aware of your job search.  Ask them to keep your job search as confidential as possible because you don’t want it to get back to your employer that you’re interviewing.  This should not rule you out as a potential employee.

Leave your current employer off your list of references.

The worst thing that can happen is your current employer finding out about your job search from a reference call.  There’s no rule that states you have to have a reference from your present job.  Create a list of references that includes contacts from previous positions that can speak to the abilities that you’re looking to showcase.  If the interviewer asks for a recommendation from someone at your current place of employment, direct them to an endorsement on your LinkedIn profile from a supervisor or colleague.

Maintain a positive attitude.

Once you’ve decided to look for a new job, you probably aren’t going to be as enthusiastic about your current one.  Though you may mentally have one foot out the door, it’s important not to let it show.  Continue to focus your efforts on your current job when you’re on the clock — you never know when you might need your current employer as a reference in the future, so don’t burn that bridge.

Looking for an exciting new position in the healthcare industry? Let the experienced team at BOS Medical Staffing help.  Our professional nursing and medical staff recruiters will maintain upmost confidentiality while going above and beyond to find the right job for you.  Contact us today for access to the hidden job market.

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